Risk Management of Tipping Points [WP10]

We are exploring how non-linearity in the climate system may interact with non-linearity in the global socio-economic system to potentially produce tipping points in the coupled together climate-socio-economic system. Our emphasis is on characterising the local consequences of climate tipping, including possibilities of adaptation and early-warning. We are analysing the potential link between climate and conflict through food insecurity or extreme weather events triggering disruption in food exports. We are analysing the robustness of European infrastructure, such as new renewable energy, to extreme climate. Assessing feedbacks to the energy system is a major advance in concept and methodology.

  1. Characterise social impacts and economic costs of passing tipping points in 2, 4, 6 degrees scenarios at different times at different levels of adaptation
     
  2. Combine this impacts information with assessment of the likelihood of different climate tipping points
     
  3. Develop approaches to early-warning of tipping-point thresholds
     
  4. Develop adaptation and assess the limits of adaptation to tipping points
     
  5. Incorporate into HELIXscope visualisation tool

Related Publications

Related News

HELIX research: Accounting for risk of tipping points implies increased carbon pricing

Accounting for the possibility of climate change tipping points in economic models leads to a substantial increase in the "optimal" carbon price, suggests a new paper published in Nature Climate... HELIX research: Accounting for risk of tipping points implies increased carbon pricing Read more